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*5
Climate change. Pandemics. Catastrophic volcanoes. Should we just give up and accept our doom? Absolutely not. Homo sapiens will survive the next mass extinction.This speculative and hopeful work of popular science focuses our attention on humanity’s long history of dodging the bullet of extinction—and suggests practical ways to keep doing it. From bacteria labs in St. Louis to ancient underground cities in central Turkey, we discover the keys to long-term survival. This book leads us away from apocalyptic thinking, into a future where we live to build a better world.
Out now! [Indie Bound | Powells | Amazon | Barnes and Noble]
Find out more about Annalee Newitz.
An Amazon book of the month (May) and Amazon best book of the year so far (July).
A Scientific American recommended book

In Scatter, Adapt, and Remember, Annalee Newitz presents a …prophylaxis for the apocalypse.—Washington Post
"An animated and absorbing account into how life has survived mass extinctions so far…and what we need to do to make sure humans don’t perish in the next one… Humans may be experts at destroying the planet, but we are no slouches at preserving it, either, and Newitz’s shrewd speculations are heartening."—Kirkus Reviews
Walking Dead fans know, few things are more enjoyable than touring the apocalypse from the safety of your living room. Even as Scatter, Adapt, and Remember cheerfully reminds us that asteroid impacts, mega-volcanos and methane eruptions are certain to come, it suggests how humankind can survive and even thrive. Yes, Annalee Newitz promises, the world will end with a bang, but our species doesn’t have to end with a whimper. Scatter, Adapt, and Remember is a guide to Homo sapiens' next million years. I had fun reading this book and you will too.”—Charles Mann, author of 1491
“Scatter, Adapt, and Remember is a refreshingly optimistic and well thought out dissection of that perennial worry: the coming apocalypse. While everyone else stridently shouts about the end of days, this book asks and answers a simple question: ‘If it’s so bad, then why are we still alive?’ I found myself in awe of the incredible extinction events that humankind—and life in general—has already survived, and Newitz inspires us with engaging arguments that our race will keep reaching the end of the world and then keep living through it. Scatter, Adapt, and Remember intimately acquaints the reader with our two-hundred-thousand-year tradition of survival—nothing less than our shared heritage as human beings.”—Daniel H. Wilson, author of Robopocalypse and Amped“One part OMNI-grade optimistic futurism; one part terrifying disaster-history; entirely awesome and inspiring. A FTL rocket-ride through extinction and its discontents.”—Cory Doctorow, author of Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom“This book is not a survivalist guide but rather a grand historical overview that puts humanity in the middle of its evolution, with fascinating looks both back and forward in time. An enormous amount of knowledge is gathered here, and the book accomplishes something almost impossible, being extremely interesting on every single page. A real pleasure to read and think about.”—Kim Stanley Robinson, author of the Mars Trilogy"One of the best popular science books I’ve read in a long, long time—and perhaps the only one that takes such a clear-eyed view of the future."—Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus

Climate change. Pandemics. Catastrophic volcanoes. Should we just give up and accept our doom? Absolutely not. Homo sapiens will survive the next mass extinction.

This speculative and hopeful work of popular science focuses our attention on humanity’s long history of dodging the bullet of extinction—and suggests practical ways to keep doing it. From bacteria labs in St. Louis to ancient underground cities in central Turkey, we discover the keys to long-term survival. This book leads us away from apocalyptic thinking, into a future where we live to build a better world.

Out now! [Indie Bound | Powells | Amazon | Barnes and Noble]

Find out more about Annalee Newitz.

An Amazon book of the month (May) and Amazon best book of the year so far (July).

Scientific American recommended book

In Scatter, Adapt, and Remember, Annalee Newitz presents a …prophylaxis for the apocalypse.
Washington Post

"An animated and absorbing account into how life has survived mass extinctions so far…and what we need to do to make sure humans don’t perish in the next one… Humans may be experts at destroying the planet, but we are no slouches at preserving it, either, and Newitz’s shrewd speculations are heartening."
Kirkus Reviews

Walking Dead fans know, few things are more enjoyable than touring the apocalypse from the safety of your living room. Even as Scatter, Adapt, and Remember cheerfully reminds us that asteroid impacts, mega-volcanos and methane eruptions are certain to come, it suggests how humankind can survive and even thrive. Yes, Annalee Newitz promises, the world will end with a bang, but our species doesn’t have to end with a whimper. Scatter, Adapt, and Remember is a guide to Homo sapiens' next million years. I had fun reading this book and you will too.”
—Charles Mann, author of 1491


Scatter, Adapt, and Remember is a refreshingly optimistic and well thought out dissection of that perennial worry: the coming apocalypse. While everyone else stridently shouts about the end of days, this book asks and answers a simple question: ‘If it’s so bad, then why are we still alive?’ I found myself in awe of the incredible extinction events that humankind—and life in general—has already survived, and Newitz inspires us with engaging arguments that our race will keep reaching the end of the world and then keep living through it. Scatter, Adapt, and Remember intimately acquaints the reader with our two-hundred-thousand-year tradition of survival—nothing less than our shared heritage as human beings.”
—Daniel H. Wilson, author of Robopocalypse and Amped


“One part OMNI-grade optimistic futurism; one part terrifying disaster-history; entirely awesome and inspiring. A FTL rocket-ride through extinction and its discontents.”
—Cory Doctorow, author of Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom


“This book is not a survivalist guide but rather a grand historical overview that puts humanity in the middle of its evolution, with fascinating looks both back and forward in time. An enormous amount of knowledge is gathered here, and the book accomplishes something almost impossible, being extremely interesting on every single page. A real pleasure to read and think about.”
—Kim Stanley Robinson, author of the Mars Trilogy


"One of the best popular science books I’ve read in a long, long time—and perhaps the only one that takes such a clear-eyed view of the future."
—Seth Mnookin, author of The Panic Virus

*4

Book Tour Dates for Scatter, Adapt and Remember

UNITED STATES

Portland, OR

5/10 Powell’s City of Books

Reading with Douglas Wolk!

7:30pm1005 W. Burnside Street, Portland, OR

5/11 Live Wire! (Click link to buy tickets.)

7:30pm, 3000 NE Alberta Street, Portland, OR 


New York, NY

5/13:  Singularity & Co Bookstore

7:30pm, 18 Bridge Street, #1G, Brooklyn NY 11201


Washington, DC

5/15 Future Tense

6:00pmScience Club, 1136 19th St NW, WashingtonDC


San Francisco, CA

5/16  Mechanics’ Institute (Click link to buy tickets.)

6:00pm   Speech, Q&A, signing  57 Post Street, San Francisco, CA


Phoenix, AZ

5/21  Changing Hands Bookstore

7:00pm Speech, Q&A, signing  6428 S. McClintock Drive, Tempe, AZ 85283


Seattle, WA

5/22  Town Hall (partnered with University Book Store and Seattle Science Lectures)

7:30pm, 1119 8th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101


Madison, WI

5/25 WisCon


Chicago, IL

5/28  Unabridged Bookstore

7:00pm, 3251 N. Broadway, Chicago, IL 60657


Atlanta, GA

5/29  Georgia Center for the Book (partnered with Atlanta Science Tavern)

7:15pm, DeKalb County Public Library, 215 Sycamore St., Decatur, GA, 30030


San Francisco, CA

6/1 Borderlands Books

3:00 pm, 866 Valencia St., San Francisco, CA 94110


Berkeley, CA

6/4 Bookish

7:00 PM, 1816 Euclid Ave., Berkeley, CA


AUSTRALIA

Week of July 1: Melbourne